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Immunosuppression -- adverse effects. : Infections in cancer patients / edited by John N. Greene  2004 1
Immunosuppression -- Age factors. : Aging, immunity, and infection / by Joseph F. Albright and Julia W. Albright  2003 1
Immunosuppression -- Complications   2
Immunosuppression -- Congresses : CMV-related immunopathology / 1st International Consensus Round Table Meeting on CMV-Related Immunopatholoy, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, August 28-30, 1997 ; volume editors, Martin Scholz [and others]  1998 1
Immunosuppression -- Nursing. : Nursing care of the immunocompromised patient / M. Linda Workman, Jan Ellerhorst-Ryan, Victoria Hargrave-Koertge  1993 1
 

Immunosuppression (Physiology) -- See Immune Tolerance


The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc
  1
Immunosuppression -- Risk factors. : The enemy within : the high cost of living near nuclear reactors : breast cancer, AIDS, low birthweights, and other radiation-induced immune deficiency effects / by Jay M. Gould, with members of the Radiation and Public Health Project, Ernest J. Sternglass, Joseph J. Mangano, William McDonnell  1996 1
Immunosuppression Therapy   6
Immunosuppression -- United States : Low-level radiation and immune system damage : an atomic era legacy / Joseph J. Mangano, the Radiation and Public Health Project, New York, New York  2018 1
 

Immunosuppressions -- See Immunosuppression


Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs
  1
 

Immunosuppressions (Physiology) -- See Immune Tolerance


The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc
  1
  Immunosuppressive Agents -- 5 Related Subjects   5
Immunosuppressive Agents.   12
Immunosuppressive Agents -- adverse effects   6
Immunosuppressive Agents -- economics : Extending Medicare coverage for preventive and other services / Marilyn J. Field, Robert L. [i.e. Robert S.] Lawrence, and Lee Zwanziger, editors ; Committee on Medicare Coverage Extensions, Division of Health Care Services, Institute of Medicine  2000 1
Immunosuppressive Agents -- pharmacology   3
Immunosuppressive agents -- Side effects.   2
Immunosuppressive Agents -- therapeutic use   3
 

Immunosuppressive drugs -- See Immunosuppressive agents


  1
Immunotaxonomy. : Toward precision medicine : building a knowledge network for biomedical research and a new taxonomy of disease / Committee on a framework for developing a new taxonomy of disease ; Board on Life Sciences ; Division on Earth and Life Studies  2011 1
Immunotechnology.   2
Immunotechnology -- Periodicals : Immunotechnology (Online)  1999 1
Immunoter├ápia. : Immunotherapy / edited by Aung Naing, Joud Hajjar  2021 1
Immunotherapie.   2
 

Immunotherapies -- See Immunotherapy


Manipulation of the host's immune system in treatment of disease. It includes both active and passive immunization as well as immunosuppressive therapy to prevent graft rejection
  1
 

Immunotherapies, Active -- See Immunotherapy, Active


Active immunization where vaccine is administered for therapeutic or preventive purposes. This can include administration of immunopotentiating agents such as BCG vaccine and Corynebacterium parvum as well as biological response modifiers such as interferons, interleukins, and colony-stimulating factors in order to directly stimulate the immune system
  1
 

Immunotherapies, Adoptive -- See Immunotherapy, Adoptive


Form of adoptive transfer where cells with antitumor activity are transferred to the tumor-bearing host in order to mediate tumor regression. The lymphoid cells commonly used are lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). This is usually considered a form of passive immunotherapy. (From DeVita, et al., Cancer, 1993, pp.305-7, 314)
  1
 

Immunotherapies, Adoptive Cellular -- See Immunotherapy, Adoptive


Form of adoptive transfer where cells with antitumor activity are transferred to the tumor-bearing host in order to mediate tumor regression. The lymphoid cells commonly used are lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). This is usually considered a form of passive immunotherapy. (From DeVita, et al., Cancer, 1993, pp.305-7, 314)
  1
 

Immunotherapies, Allergen -- See Desensitization, Immunologic


Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity
  1
 

Immunotherapies, Passive -- See Immunization, Passive


Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER)
  1
  Immunotherapy -- 3 Related Subjects   3
Immunotherapy.   108
Immunotherapy, Active   9
Immunotherapy, Active -- methods : Immunologic adjuvant research / Antonio H. Benvenuto, editor  2009 1
Immunotherapy, Adoptive   4
 

Immunotherapy, Adoptive Cellular -- See Immunotherapy, Adoptive


Form of adoptive transfer where cells with antitumor activity are transferred to the tumor-bearing host in order to mediate tumor regression. The lymphoid cells commonly used are lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). This is usually considered a form of passive immunotherapy. (From DeVita, et al., Cancer, 1993, pp.305-7, 314)
  1
Immunotherapy, Adoptive -- methods : Cellular therapy of cancer : development of gene therapy based approaches / editor, Robert E. Hawkins  2014 1
Immunotherapy -- adverse effects : Handbook of cancer treatment-related toxicities / Vamsi Velcheti, Salman R. Punekar  2022 1
 

Immunotherapy, Allergen -- See Desensitization, Immunologic


Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity
  1
Allergy -- Immunotherapy   7
Asthma -- Immunotherapy.   2
Autoimmune diseases -- Immunotherapy   3
Brain -- Tumors -- Immunotherapy   2
Cancer -- Immunotherapy.   66
Cancer -- Immunotherapy -- Complications   2
Cancer -- Immunotherapy -- Congresses : Policy Issues in the Clinical Development and Use of Immunotherapy for Cancer Treatment : Proceedings of a Workshop  1969 1
Cancer -- Immunotherapy -- Periodicals : Journal for immunotherapy of cancer  2013- 1
Immunotherapy -- Complications. : Managing immunotherapy related organ toxicities : a practical guide / Yinghong Wang, editor  2022 1
Immunotherapy -- Congresses : Immunotherapy in 2020 : visions and trends for targeting inflammatory disease / A. Radbruch [and others], editors  2007 1
Diabetes -- Immunotherapy -- Congresses. : Defining optimal immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes  2008 1
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