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Author Chatelain, Marcia, 1979- author.

Title South side girls : growing up in the great migration / Marcia Chatelain
Published Durham ; London : Duke University Press, [2015]
©2015
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Description 1 online resource (xx, 240 pages) : illustrations, portraits
Series Book collections on Project MUSE
Contents I will thank you all with all my heart: girls and the great migration -- Do you see that girl?: the dependent, the destitute, and the delinquent black girl -- Modesty on her cheek: girls and great migration marketplaces -- The possibilities of the negro girl: black girls and the great depression -- Did i do right?: the black girl citizen -- She was fighting for her father's freedom: girls after the great migration
Summary In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago's black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago's black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents'and community leaders'anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. Girls shouldered much of the burden of black aspiration, as adults often scrutinized their choices and behavior, and their well-being symbolized the community's moral health. Yet these adults were not alone in thinking about the Great Migration, as girls expressed their views as well. Referencing girls'letters and interviews, Chatelain uses their powerful stories of hope, anticipation and disappointment to highlight their feelings and thoughts, and in so doing, she helps restore the experiences of an understudied population to the Great Migration's complex narrative
Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girlhood. She argues that the construction of black girlhood in Chicago between 1910 and 1940 reflected the black community's anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress, as well as responses to major events and social crises
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (pages 215-231) and index
Notes Print version record
Subject African American girls -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century
African American girls -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century
African American girls -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Social conditions -- 20th century
African American girls.
Binnenwanderung
HISTORY / United States / 20th Century
Mädchen
Race relations.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Discrimination & Race Relations.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Minority Studies.
Schwarze
Social conditions.
Soziale Situation
Chicago (Ill.) -- History -- 1875-
Chicago (Ill.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century
Chicago (Ill.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century
Chicago, Ill.
Illinois -- Chicago.
Genre/Form History.
Form Electronic book
LC no. 2014040374
ISBN 0822375702
9780822375708