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Dermatoneurosis -- See Neurocutaneous disorders


  1
Dermatopatias.   2
 

Dermatophagoide -- See Pyroglyphidae


Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus
  1
 

Dermatophagoides -- See Pyroglyphidae


Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus
  1
  Dermatopharmacology -- 2 Related Subjects   2
Dermatopharmacology.   15
Dermatopharmacology -- Handbooks, manuals, etc   6
Dermatopharmacology -- Periodicals.   3
 

Dermatophytes -- See Also Dermatomycoses


  1
Dermatophytes. : Dermatophytes and dermatophytoses / Jean-Philippe Bouchara, Pietro Nenoff, Aditya K. Gupta, Vishnu Chaturvedi, editors  2021 1
 

Dermatophytoses -- See Dermatomycoses


  1
 

Dermatoplasties -- See Skin Transplantation


The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin
  1
 

Dermatoplasty -- See Skin Transplantation


The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin
  1
 

Dermatopolymyositis -- See Dermatomyositis


A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)
  1
 

Dermatopsychosomatic diseases -- See Skin Diseases Psychosomatic aspects


  1
 

Dermatopsychosomatic disorders -- See Skin Diseases Psychosomatic aspects


  1
  Dermatosclerosis -- 2 Related Subjects   2
  Dermatoses -- 2 Related Subjects   2
 

Dermatoses, Bullous -- See Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous


Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
  1
Dermatoses du cuir chevelu -- ethnologie. : Hair and scalp diseases : medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatments / edited by Amy J. McMichael, Maria K. Hordinsky  2008 1
Dermatoses du cuir chevelu -- thérapie. : Hair and scalp diseases : medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatments / edited by Amy J. McMichael, Maria K. Hordinsky  2008 1
 

Dermatoses, Foot -- See Foot Dermatoses


Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified
  1
 

Dermatoses, Hand -- See Hand Dermatoses


Skin diseases involving the HANDS
  1
 

Dermatoses, Industrial -- See Dermatitis, Occupational


A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place
  1
 

Dermatoses, Linear IgA -- See Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis


Autoimmune disease characterized by subepidermal blisters and linear deposition of autoantibodies at the dermoepidermal junction. The accumulated autoantibodies are of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and occasionally IMMUNOGLOBULIN G classes against epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE proteins. The dermatosis is sometimes associated with malignancies and use of certain drugs (e.g., VANCOMYCIN)
  1
 

Dermatoses, Scalp -- See Scalp Dermatoses


Skin diseases involving the SCALP
  1
 

Dermatoses, Subcorneal Pustular -- See Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous


Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
  1
 

Dermatoses, Vesiculobullous -- See Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous


Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
  1
 

Dermatosis -- See Skin Diseases


Diseases involving the DERMIS or EPIDERMIS
  1
 

Dermatosis, Foot -- See Foot Dermatoses


Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified
  1
 

Dermatosis, Hand -- See Hand Dermatoses


Skin diseases involving the HANDS
  1
 

Dermatosis, Industrial -- See Dermatitis, Occupational


A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place
  1
 

Dermatosis, Linear IgA -- See Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis


Autoimmune disease characterized by subepidermal blisters and linear deposition of autoantibodies at the dermoepidermal junction. The accumulated autoantibodies are of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and occasionally IMMUNOGLOBULIN G classes against epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE proteins. The dermatosis is sometimes associated with malignancies and use of certain drugs (e.g., VANCOMYCIN)
  1
 

Dermatosis, Neutrophilic, Febrile, Acute -- See Sweet Syndrome


Condition characterized by large, rapidly extending, erythematous, tender plaques on the upper body usually accompanied by fever and dermal infiltration of neutrophilic leukocytes. It occurs mostly in middle-aged women, is often preceded by an upper respiratory infection, and clinically resembles ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME. Sweet syndrome is associated with LEUKEMIA
  1
 

Dermatosis, Scalp -- See Scalp Dermatoses


Skin diseases involving the SCALP
  1
 

Dermatosis, Subcorneal Pustular -- See Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous


Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
  1
Dermatotoxicologia.   2
Dermatotoxicologie. : Dermal and ocular toxicology : fundamentals and methods / editor, David W. Hobson  1991 1
Dermatotoxicologie -- Méthodologie. : Dermatotoxicology methods : the laboratory worker's vade mecum / edited by Francis N. Marzulli and Howard I. Maibach  2019 1
Dermatotoxicology.   21
Dermatotoxicology -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.   5
Dermatotoxicology -- Mathematical models : Dermal absorption models in toxicology and pharmacology / edited by Jim E. Riviere  2005 1
Dermatotoxicology -- Methodology. : Surface and dermal sampling  2011 1
Dermatotoxicology -- Methodology -- Periodicals. : Indian journal of dermatopathology and diagnostic dermatology  2014- 1
Dermatotoxicology -- Periodicals   2
Dermatotoxicology -- Technique : Dermal and ocular toxicology : fundamentals and methods / editor, David W. Hobson  1991 1
Dermatotoxicology -- Toxicology : Dermatotoxicology methods : the laboratory worker's vade mecum / edited by Francis N. Marzulli and Howard I. Maibach  2019 1
 

Dermatotoxins -- See Dermotoxins


Specific substances elaborated by plants, microorganisms or animals that cause damage to the skin; they may be proteins or other specific factors or substances; constituents of spider, jellyfish or other venoms cause dermonecrosis and certain bacteria synthesize dermolytic agents
  1
Dermatotoxizität : Dermal and ocular toxicology : fundamentals and methods / editor, David W. Hobson  1991 1
Dermestidae.   2
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